The MacDonald Section of the Tamborine National Park

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MacDonald Section Walking Trail


Turn into “Wongawallen Road” at the upper roundabout of “Gallery Walk”, parking is about 200 meters down the road on the left opposite the “Heritage Centre”.  The parking area is limited, however, plenty of additional parking space is available on both sides of the road.

“Wongawallen Road” Carpark:

Car parking spaces: 9
Disabled car parking spaces: NO
Bus parking spaces: NO
Public Toilets: NO
Picnic Settings: YES – 1x 12-seater
Sheltered Picnic Settings: YES – 2x 8-seater
Additional seating: NO
Views: NO
Information Board: YES – General Information

MacDonald Circuit (D6), 1.4km return, allow 35 minutes, easy grade

BBQ and Picnic Shelter

This area of land was named after Miss Jessie MacDonald, who generously donated part of this area to become a National Park in 1933.  Picnic facilities include a small shelter shed and a large picnic table at the start of the walking track on the edge of the rainforest.

This precious track of subtropical rainforest is popular with bird watchers, and offers visitors a quiet rainforest bush walk away from street noise and crowds.  The circuit is easy to navigate and very enjoyable

This relatively flat loop track passes through rainforest with towering strangler figs, beautiful piccabeen palm groves and tall trees with vines and ferns.   Shortly after the start of the bush walk keep to your left as you enter the loop track.  At the “T” junction, a small fence has been erected to prevent walkers taking a short-cut through the forest – please stay on the track and help protect the rainforest! (13 stairs)

Strangler Figs

The circuit meanders gently downhill, passing two impressive strangler figs on the right of the track.  A couple of narrower sections are created by large trees.  Often, the ground is covered by hundreds of palm fringes, care should be taken especially after heavy rain.

Timber Log Bridge

Occasionally, walkers are reminded of how close this section of the Tamborine National park is to suburban living with some sounds filtering through the rainforest at certain times of the day.  Closer towards the lower-most point of the track it becomes slightly steeper and than starts to gradually wind its way back up hill again.

After three small timber log creek crossings, walkers come past an uprooted tree resting on another one.  Shortly after a fourth timber log creek crossing, the circuit is complete (3 stairs).

The car park is reached by turning left at the fenced “T” junction.